How to Help A Grieving Child

How to Help A Grieving Child

How to Help A Grieving Child

Losing a loved one is heartbreaking, and the situation becomes more complex when you are dealing with how to help a grieving child. Helping children navigate the complex emotions associated with grief and loss can be an overwhelming task. As a Jewish funeral home, our mission goes beyond providing funeral services; we aim to support families during their most vulnerable times. Here we explore the unique perspective of assisting children throughout the mourning process within the context of Jewish traditions and funeral customs.

1. Honoring Jewish Funeral Customs:

Judaism places great importance on mourning rituals, providing structure and support during times of grief. Our website contains resources that aim to educate children and their families about Jewish customs, such as Shiva, Kaddish, and Yahrzeit. We explain the significance of these practices and how they help preserve memories and provide comfort during the grieving process.

2. Creating a Safe and Open Environment:

Children process grief differently from adults and may require a safe space to express their emotions freely.  Strive to create an environment where children feel comfortable sharing their thoughts and concerns without judgment. By fostering an atmosphere of trust and compassion, you can guide them towards understanding and acceptance as they cope with their loss.

3. Age-Appropriate Explanations:

When dealing with how to help a grieving child, it is crucial to offer age-appropriate explanations about death and the grieving process. Use clarity and sensitivity in your conversations, ensuring that children understand the concept of death in a way that aligns with their emotional development. By using simple language and compassionate communication,  children gradually grasp the reality of their loved one’s passing and its implications.

4. Encouraging Grief Expression:

Allowing children to express their grief in their own unique ways is essential for their healing journey. There are  various forms of grief expression, including art therapy, journaling, and storytelling. By encouraging children to express their emotions creatively, you are providing them with an outlet to process their feelings and explore healthy coping mechanisms.

5. Inclusion in Funeral Ceremonies:

Children are often actively involved in the funeral and mourning rituals. However, children should have the opportunity to participate when they feel comfortable and willing. Inclusion can range from performing symbolic actions during the funeral service or contributing to the eulogy. Participating in these rituals can help children find closure, gain a sense of belonging, and honor their loved one’s memory.

6. Supporting Siblings and Peers:

When a child experiences loss, their siblings and peers may also be affected deeply. You can  support siblings by providing resources and opportunities for them to connect with other children who have experienced similar losses. Group counseling sessions, playdates, or grief camps can help facilitate discussions and foster a sense of belonging and understanding among these young individuals.

Star Of David Memorial Chapels Is Here To Help!

Grief and loss impact children differently than adults, requiring a unique approach to help them navigate this profound life experience. Our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, are here to guide you through difficult times. Whether it is for funeral pre-planning, making funeral arrangements, or providing grief resources that aid in how to help a grieving child, we are here for you. Please get in touch with us at 631-454-9600.

What is the Significance of a Jewish Unveiling?

What is the Significance of a Jewish Unveiling?

What is the Significance of a Jewish Unveiling?

In the realm of Jewish traditions, the Jewish unveiling ceremony holds deep significance and serves as a poignant moment of remembrance for loved ones who have departed. 

Understanding the Significance:

Dating back centuries, those of the Jewish faith have embraced rituals that respect the deceased while providing solace to those in mourning. The Jewish unveiling ceremony typically occurs a year after the burial, or time of the Yahrzeit. This gives time for the initial grief to subside and allows the family to prepare for this important milestone. It represents the moment when the headstone or cemetery monument is revealed. Therefore, serving as a symbolic gesture to honor the memory of the departed and acknowledge the completion of the Jewish mourning period.

Preparing for the Ceremony:

Prior to the unveiling, meticulous preparation takes place. Families collaborate closely with a cemetery monument company to design an engraved headstone. A Jewish headstone often incorporates Hebrew inscriptions, the departed’s name, and personal messages. The headstone becomes a tangible connection to their loved one, providing an enduring monument and inviting future generations to learn about their family heritage while paying respects.

The Ritual of Unveiling:

The unveiling ceremony itself is conducted at the gravesite and is attended by close family members and friends. A rabbi or a loved one may lead the service, reciting prayers such as the Mourner’s Kaddish, psalms, or meaningful passages from Jewish texts. The atmosphere is solemn, providing a safe space for expressions of grief and memories of the deceased.

The Unveiling Process:

Following an invocation, family members remove a cloth or covering, symbolically revealing the headstone inscription. This symbolic act represents the unveiling of the memories and legacy left behind. It also signifies that the departed’s soul has ascended and is at peace. Lastly, it encourages attendees to reflect on their own mortality, emphasizing the importance of cherishing every moment of life.

Expressions of Remembrance and Recollection:

The unveiling ceremony also provides an opportunity for family members and friends to celebrate the life of the decedent by sharing memories and stories about the departed, commemorating their impact on the lives they touched. 

The Healing Power of Unity:

Beyond the specific rituals and traditions, an unveiling ceremony intersects the shared grief of family members, friends, and the wider Jewish community. Attending the ceremony offers solace to those who are still grappling with their loss. The power of coming together cannot be overstated. The support network built during this moment plays a vital role in the healing process. An unveiling is often followed by a meal where attendees remember their loved one in a more jovial environment. Perhaps at a restaurant or location that bears significance for the family members. 

Honoring one’s heritage and traditions is an essential element of the grieving process. The unveiling ceremony encapsulates the Jewish values of remembrance, community, and the celebration of life. By embracing these customs, families receive the comfort and support they need.

We Are Here To Help!

Our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, are here to guide you through difficult times. Whether it is for funeral pre-planning, making funeral arrangements, or providing information after your loved one is buried, we are here for you. Please get in touch with us at 631-454-9600.

Limo driving

BENEFITS OF A FUNERAL HOME NEAR THE CEMETERY

Limo driving

One of the most important considerations when choosing a funeral home is proximity to the cemetery. A funeral home near the cemetery allows for greater convenience in transporting the body, removes stress and anxiety associated with a long procession to the cemetery, and holds additional benefits that should not be overlooked.

Many people do not give funeral processions a second thought when making end-of-life planning decisions. However, it may play a more significant part in the decision-making process once the value of convenience becomes apparent.

Here are several positive attributes of short funeral processions:

1. Holding a funeral service at a funeral home near the cemetery reduces travel time for family members and those participating in the procession to the burial site. Moving along shorter distances minimizes stress associated with traveling and allows for more time to spend together during the service. Additionally, it prevents encountering unexpected traffic delays that can lead to lateness and added anxiety.

Saying goodbye is a stressful experience, and a smooth transition from the chapel service to the gravesite is ideal. It is best to feel calm upon arrival at the cemetery gates. Being in a relaxed state will ease the process of saying final goodbyes.

2. Reduced travel time in a procession creates safer conditions. Funeral attendees often follow the procession through red lights and stop signs to keep everyone together. Most motorists are aware of and adhere to funeral procession etiquette. However, there is always a chance that an accident may occur due to a deviation from traffic rules.

Keep in mind that processions date back to ancient times. They have evolved over centuries but continue to operate as a contiguous line of cars, even with hectic, modern-day traffic conditions. Navigating what could be a fairly extensive line of vehicles through today’s bustling roadways and intersections can be a daunting task.

While processions are carried out as a sign of respect towards the deceased, reducing the drive time does not diminish this observance.

3. Using a funeral home near the cemetery reduces travel costs associated with the transportation of the body and for those attending services. Hearse and limousine fees are generally based on a specific number of miles. Prices can increase per mile after going above the preset distance.

It is worthwhile to consider all of these benefits when making funeral arrangements. The advantages remain true whether planning a funeral at the time of need or in advance.

We are Here for You!

For those looking for a Jewish funeral home close to a cemetery on Long Island, New York, consider Star of David Memorial Chapels. We are located moments away from many of Long Island’s Jewish cemeteries, including New MontefioreBeth MosesWellwood, and Mount Ararat. The uniquely convenient location of our funeral chapels enables us to think of ourselves as “Procession-Proof.”

Aside from our advantageous location, we offer a wide range of services to meet each family’s needs. Contact our funeral directors if you need additional information. Our team will be happy to answer any questions. Call us at 631-454-9600.

When Hanukkah is on the horizon, we think about all the good times and great traditions that come with it. The last thing on our minds is funerals and what would happen should a death occur during this joyous holiday. But we can experience death and mourning at any time and the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah is no exception. What Happens if Someone Dies During Hanukkah? The Hanukkah celebration lasts for eight nights. Unfortunately, death can happen just before or during this time. If so, since a Jewish burial takes place within 24-48 hours after the death occurred, the funeral and shiva will inevitably overlap with the holiday. And the presence of the holiday would not change this timing. The only timeframe during Hanukkah that a funeral or shiva would not be permissible is Shabbat, similar to non-holiday rules. Is Shiva Affected by Hanukkah? As with Shabbat, the Jewish holidays have nuances pertaining to funerals and the mourning period, shiva. Some holidays like Yom Kippur and Passover, have more specific changes than others. Hanukkah does not disrupt sitting shiva or the ability to pay a shiva call. The practice of receiving support and comfort from friends and family members is perfectly acceptable throughout the holiday. Open acts of mourning, such as torn clothing or wearing a black ribbon, are not carried out during festivals such as Hanukkah. Is it Okay to Have a Holiday Meal Together? Some families honor their deceased loved ones while gathering together for a holiday meal during Hanukkah. Acknowledging and participating in the festive holiday while reminiscing allows the living to celebrate the life of the departed in a joyful way. Do We Still Light the Menorah? On Hanukkah, it is acceptable for mourners to kindle the menorah and say a prayer in remembrance of the decedent. Families who have recently lost a member may choose not to light the menorah to express their grief. This practice symbolically reflects the decreased light in the home due to the deceased's absence. Can We Attend Hanukkah Services with the Congregation? During shiva, the family refrains from making public appearances and remains in their home. Fortunately, we mainly celebrate Hanukkah within the home. Although the mourners are welcome to attend holiday services, they should not take on any leadership roles. Any activities performed by the family during this time of grieving should be done carefully and in conjunction with their state of mourning. Hanukkah Enables the Connection to Loved Ones Even if You are Grieving The true spirit of Hanukkah is about being grateful for what we have in our lives - and honoring those who are no longer with us. We celebrate Hanukkah by spending time with family, which mirrors the practices of shiva. Assistance is Available if You Need It What families experiencing a loss observe varies based on individual beliefs and religious practices. A rabbi can confirm the procedures for a funeral or shiva if you encounter a death around holiday time. Contact our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, if you have any questions about planning Jewish funerals during Hanukkah. Our team will guide you through every step of the process and will be happy to answer any questions. Call us today at 631-454-9600.

Funerals and Shiva During Hanukkah

When Hanukkah is on the horizon, we think about all the good times and great traditions that come with it. The last thing on our minds is funerals and what would happen should a death occur during this joyous holiday. But we can experience death and mourning at any time and the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah is no exception. What Happens if Someone Dies During Hanukkah? The Hanukkah celebration lasts for eight nights. Unfortunately, death can happen just before or during this time. If so, since a Jewish burial takes place within 24-48 hours after the death occurred, the funeral and shiva will inevitably overlap with the holiday. And the presence of the holiday would not change this timing. The only timeframe during Hanukkah that a funeral or shiva would not be permissible is Shabbat, similar to non-holiday rules. Is Shiva Affected by Hanukkah? As with Shabbat, the Jewish holidays have nuances pertaining to funerals and the mourning period, shiva. Some holidays like Yom Kippur and Passover, have more specific changes than others. Hanukkah does not disrupt sitting shiva or the ability to pay a shiva call. The practice of receiving support and comfort from friends and family members is perfectly acceptable throughout the holiday. Open acts of mourning, such as torn clothing or wearing a black ribbon, are not carried out during festivals such as Hanukkah. Is it Okay to Have a Holiday Meal Together? Some families honor their deceased loved ones while gathering together for a holiday meal during Hanukkah. Acknowledging and participating in the festive holiday while reminiscing allows the living to celebrate the life of the departed in a joyful way. Do We Still Light the Menorah? On Hanukkah, it is acceptable for mourners to kindle the menorah and say a prayer in remembrance of the decedent. Families who have recently lost a member may choose not to light the menorah to express their grief. This practice symbolically reflects the decreased light in the home due to the deceased's absence. Can We Attend Hanukkah Services with the Congregation? During shiva, the family refrains from making public appearances and remains in their home. Fortunately, we mainly celebrate Hanukkah within the home. Although the mourners are welcome to attend holiday services, they should not take on any leadership roles. Any activities performed by the family during this time of grieving should be done carefully and in conjunction with their state of mourning. Hanukkah Enables the Connection to Loved Ones Even if You are Grieving The true spirit of Hanukkah is about being grateful for what we have in our lives - and honoring those who are no longer with us. We celebrate Hanukkah by spending time with family, which mirrors the practices of shiva. Assistance is Available if You Need It What families experiencing a loss observe varies based on individual beliefs and religious practices. A rabbi can confirm the procedures for a funeral or shiva if you encounter a death around holiday time. Contact our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, if you have any questions about planning Jewish funerals during Hanukkah. Our team will guide you through every step of the process and will be happy to answer any questions. Call us today at 631-454-9600.

When Hanukkah is on the horizon, we think about all the good times and great traditions that come with it. The last thing on our minds is funerals and what would happen should a death occur during this joyous holiday. But we can experience death and mourning at any time and the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah is no exception. Learn more about funerals and shiva during Hanukkah. 

What Happens if Someone Dies During Hanukkah?

The Hanukkah celebration lasts for eight nights. Unfortunately, death can happen just before or during this time. If so, since a Jewish burial takes place within 24-48 hours after the death occurred, the funeral and shiva will inevitably overlap with the holiday. And the presence of the holiday would not change this timing. The only timeframe during Hanukkah that a funeral or shiva would not be permissible is Shabbat, similar to non-holiday rules. 

Is Shiva Affected by Hanukkah?

As with Shabbat, the Jewish holidays have nuances pertaining to funerals and the mourning period, shiva. Some holidays like Yom Kippur and Passover, have more specific changes than others. Hanukkah does not disrupt sitting shiva or the ability to pay a shiva call. The practice of receiving support and comfort from friends and family members is perfectly acceptable throughout the holiday. 

Open acts of mourning, such as torn clothing or wearing a black ribbonare not carried out during festivals such as Hanukkah. 

Is it Okay to Have a Holiday Meal Together?

Some families honor their deceased loved ones while gathering together for a holiday meal during Hanukkah. Acknowledging and participating in the festive holiday meal while reminiscing allows the living to celebrate the life of the departed in a joyful way.

Do We Still Light the Menorah?

On Hanukkah, it is acceptable for mourners to kindle the menorah and say a prayer in remembrance of the decedent. Families who have recently lost a member may choose not to light the menorah to express their grief. This practice symbolically reflects the decreased light in the home due to the deceased’s absence. 

Can We Attend Hanukkah Services with the Congregation?

During shiva, the family refrains from making public appearances and remains in their home. Fortunately, we mainly celebrate Hanukkah within the home. Although the mourners are welcome to attend holiday services, they should not take on any leadership roles. Any holiday activities performed by the family during this time of grieving should be done respectfully and in accordance with a state of mourning. 

Hanukkah Enables the Connection to Loved Ones Even if You are Grieving

The true spirit of Hanukkah is about being grateful for what we have in our lives – and honoring those who are no longer with us. We celebrate Hanukkah by spending time with family, which is also done when we attend funerals and sit shiva.

Assistance is Available if You Need It

What families experiencing a loss observe varies based on individual beliefs and religious practices. A rabbi can confirm the procedures for a funeral or shiva if you encounter a death around holiday time. 

Contact our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, if you have any questions about planning Jewish funerals during Hanukkah. Our team will guide you through every step of the process and will be happy to answer any questions. Call us today at 631-454-9600.

Tree with snow in a cemetery

How are Funerals in the Winter Handled?

Tree with snow in a cemetery

There is no ideal time for a funeral, but some seasons are more conducive to assembling at a cemetery for burial than others. When the colder temperatures arrive, and a funeral has to be scheduled, many people ask, “How are funerals in the winter handled?”

The presence of extremely low temperatures, wind, snow, and ice can complicate an already challenging situation. Adverse weather conditions can make travel hazardous for attendees from out of town. Walking and standing within an unplowed cemetery in the cold can be detrimental, especially for elderly mourners. 

Despite these circumstances, a few measures can be taken to make funerals held in the winter months more comfortable for those involved.

Be Prepared with the Right Clothing and Footwear

Layering is key to staying warm and comfortable during a winter funeral service. Wear a proper jacket and accessories, such as hats, scarves, and gloves to protect your body. Additionally, if warranted, select snow boots over the footwear typically chosen for an occasion such as this. 

Stay Indoors as Much as You Can

It is best to avoid a rushed graveside service due to the inability to withstand the elements. Feeling bad for uncomfortable attendees can cause eulogies and heartfelt words to be abbreviated or hastily spoken to finish up. Plan accordingly so your loved one receives the dignified remembrance that they deserve.

Although burial is synonymous with being outdoors, it is feasible to limit the time outside as much as possible without sacrificing the quality of the funeral services. First, you can elect to hold the service indoors, within the funeral home’s chapels. The rabbi will perform a bulk of the speech and prayers during this time. Family members or other individuals wishing to speak would do so here as well. Therefore, reducing the time of the interment service at the gravesite.  

Upon arrival at the cemetery, stay inside your car until it is necessary to leave it. There is no reason to extend the time for anyone, especially elderly, infirm mourners,  to huddle around the graveside. Prayers and other Jewish traditions, such as shoveling dirt onto the casket, will still be part of the interment.

Offer Alternatives for Those Who are Traveling or Physically Unable to Withstand the Weather

If anyone cannot travel due to adverse conditions, offer a live-streamed version of the funeral. This will allow them to be present without a physical presence. To capture sentiments, create a memorial page or use the decedent’s funeral service page for family members and friends to share memories and stories about the deceased. This is an excellent way for those unable to attend the funeral service to express their love and grief, creating an online space that brings people together in their shared sorrow.

We Can Help with Funeral Planning in the Winter

Funerals in the wintertime can be difficult, but there are ways to make them more comfortable and meaningful for everyone involved. With the proper preparation, you can create an atmosphere of support and community during a difficult time. 

In the event of inclement weather, we welcome you to hold a funeral service in one of our two beautiful chapels. Our Waters of Babylon Chapel can seat up to 300 attendees, and our more intimate Isaiah Chapel can accommodate up to 100 attendees.

If you have any concerns about how Jewish funerals in the winter are handled, contact our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York. Our team will guide you through every step of the process and will be happy to answer any questions. Call us today at 631-454-9600.

Why are Jewish People Buried Within 24 Hours of Passing: What's the Rush?

Why are Jewish People Buried Within 24 Hours of Passing: What’s the Rush?

Why are Jewish People Buried Within 24 Hours of Passing: What's the Rush?

It can be puzzling when we encounter a religious tradition that is dissimilar from our own. Additionally, when it comes to rituals surrounding death, it can make us even more curious. It is safe to say that many Jewish people and funeral directors have been asked, “Why are Jewish people buried within 24 hours? What’s the rush?” If you do not know how to answer that besides, “It’s just always been how Jewish people did it,” do not worry; you are not alone. 

Here are three reasons why Jews conduct a burial within 24 hours from the date of death. In addition,  why the short period is a sign of respect for both the deceased and those in mourning.

The Law: 

Traditional Jewish law requires that a person be buried within 24 hours from the time of death. The law is in accordance with the Torah, our sacred Jewish scripture, which reads, “You shall bury him the same day. His body should not remain all night.” The religious concept underlying this law is that a human, made in the image of G-d, should be given the deepest respect. 

Various situations justify a delay even though a funeral within 24 hours is established as a general principle. This includes allowing time for family members to assemble. In these cases, some still opt to commit to the funeral within 24 hours. They will then hold memorial services at a later date when more people can attend. Furthermore, circumstances may necessitate a delay, such as when death falls on the eve of the Sabbath (a Friday night). Since the Sabbath prohibits burial, the funeral becomes delayed.

The Mind: 

Jewish law predominantly dictates a burial within 24 hours. However, the second reason is incredibly important- the psychological benefit. The mental strain of funeral planning while simultaneously entering the stage of mourning is almost unbearable. To dwell in “the valley of the shadow of death,” being subjected to the anguish of being in the physical company of the deceased for any longer than necessary, is intolerable. Jewish mourning advises that the family members not undergo that type of pain any longer than required.

The Spiritual: 

Between death and burial, the departed’s soul is in limbo, in a state of disorientation. The soul no longer inhabits the body after death. It also cannot fully leave the body until the body is laid to rest. Once the body returns to the dust from where it came, the soul can return to heaven from where it came. The soul’s onward journey begins upon interment. We do not want to delay this process, hence the funeral within a day of passing.

You Now Have the Answer to why Jewish People Buried Within 24 Hours : 

In summary, to answer the title question, we do not consider the burial a ‘rush job.’ If anything, we somehow find the strength to put our own selves and emotions aside and put every last ounce of thought and love into the recently deceased. It is a way of honoring the deceased, the family members of the deceased, and G-d. The priority is to lessen the pain of those here on earth and send loved ones to heaven as quickly as possible.

Few questions surrounding a death, whether sudden or foreseen, are easy to ask. Our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, are prepared to provide the answers you need with sensitivity and professionalism. Please get in touch with us at 631-454-9600.

How Planning Your Funeral Will Help Your Family Heal

In a previous blog post, we discussed how planning your funeral can help you communicate your final wishes and feel more at peace. But how will pre-planning your funeral help your family?

 

Your loved ones may struggle to move forward after you’re gone, and having a plan in place can help them heal. By knowing precisely what you want your funeral to be like, they can avoid having to make any difficult choices on their own. Instead, let them focus on celebrating your life and remembering the good times you shared.

 

Funeral Pre-Planning Enables Your Family Members to Properly Grieve, Not Be engrossed in Preparations

 

Due to the inherent nature of Jewish funerals’ quick turnaround, those suffering from a loss are immediately required to make decisions without a pre-planned funeral in place. This leaves little time to fully process the loss after news of a death. The bereaved’s focus would predominantly be on the details of the arrangements. Thus, initial grief temporarily gets set aside, becoming heightened after the funeral. This is counter-productive since the funeral is an instrumental part of the healing process.

 

 

Funeral Pre-Planning Can Eliminate Financial Strain on Your Family Members
 

From a financial standpoint, a benefit of funeral planning is that it allows you to set aside funds for expenses related to your death. Pre-planning can help ease the financial burden your family members might otherwise face.  Stress from needing money for funerals, memorial services, and burials may exacerbate family members’ grief. Therefore, making it almost impossible to move to a post-funeral calm.  


Funeral Pre-Planning Can Prevent Potential Disagreements Between Family Members 

 

Funeral pre-planning can help to avoid family conflicts. While a funeral may bring individuals physically together, it can also drive them apart. Collaborating and agreeing on funeral arrangements or determining who will be responsible for paying related expenses can cause animosity and other issues among family members. These scenarios can often escalate tension and add more pain to an already painful situation. The compounded anguish will then prolong grief and cause it to become more challenging to heal. 

 

 

How You Can Help Your Family Members
 

 

It may help to consider all steps that your family would have to take if your funeral is not pre-planned. Which funeral home would they call? Will they be concerned with the cost of a funeral? Would everyone be on the same page with planning? Could having to handle everything related to your funeral make everything harder on them emotionally?

 

Your family has been there for you throughout your life. So wouldn’t it be great to be there for them even when you can’t be? 

 

Contact our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, to discuss a funeral that truly reflects your life and last wishes. Our compassionate team will guide you through every step of the process and will be happy to answer any questions you may have. Call us today at 631-454-9600.

What to Say to a Grieving Individual

What to Say to a Grieving Individual

What to Say to a Grieving Individual

Knowing what to say to a grieving individual can be tricky. Of course, you know that this person is in pain and unsure of how they will move forward after the funeral and mourning rituals. But what can be said to ease the pain and facilitate their transition back to daily life after experiencing a loss?

Grieving is a highly individual and personal process, and there’s no right or wrong way to do it. Support from friends and loved ones can benefit a grieving person immensely. You can say and do many things to help support a grieving individual.

The first thing you can say will acknowledge the loss and express your sympathy. This can be as simple as “I’m sorry for your loss.”

Other things you could say that would be helpful include offering comfort or reassurance, such as saying, “I’m here for you if you ever need to talk,” or “It’s okay to feel the way you do.”

According to the National Funeral Directors Association, what people often need most is to be heard and feel understood. Simply recognizing what they are going through and expressing your understanding can go a long way in helping them feel supported. For example, “I know this is hard for you right now.”

You could also offer practical support, such as asking if you can help with meals or other chores, run errands, or assist with finding support groups. “I’m available to help you with whatever you need” is a great way to initiate this.

Whatever you say, make sure that you are actually there for the grieving person – they need your support more than ever. Just being present and listening can be incredibly supportive during this difficult time. Or, if they don’t feel like speaking, be there to sit with them.

There is no defined timeline for grief. Just remember to continue to check in and be there for the bereaved in any way you can.

We Are Here To Help!

Our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, are here to guide you through difficult times. Whether it is for funeral pre-planning, making funeral arrangements, or providing grief resources, we are here for you. Please get in touch with us at 631-454-9600.

HEALTHY GRIEF – MANAGE A LOSS BY PRIORITIZING YOUR EMOTIONAL AND PHYSICAL WELLNESS

Healthy Grief – Manage a Loss by Prioritizing Your Emotional and Physical Wellness 

HEALTHY GRIEF – MANAGE A LOSS BY PRIORITIZING YOUR EMOTIONAL AND PHYSICAL WELLNESS
Image: Pexels

Courtesy of Justin Black, www.bereaving.net/

Losing a family member or friend is one of the most stressful life events that one experiences. The grieving process is complicated and sometimes lengthy. For some adults, around seven to 10%, according to the American Psychiatric Association, this could turn into prolonged grief disorder, making it difficult to focus and engage in daily activities. Here are some strategies to deal with grief in a healthy way.

Add Exercise to Your Day 

Physical activity helps with stress and anxiety management and may help during a time of mourning. Think about ways to add exercise to your day, even if you aren’t up for a fitness class. If you have a busy work schedule, take the stairs instead of the elevator or schedule a walk outside during your lunch break.

Focus on Healthy Foods

What you eat may also affect your healing process. Aim to eat healthy, wholesome meals that you cook instead of fast food or snacks. Avoid binging or other stress eating habits.

Switch Up Your Home Decor

A peaceful home environment also may help you heal. Try decluttering to reduce stress, revamping closet and cabinet spaces or reorganizing rooms to clear away space for more serenity and meditation.

Get Enough Sleep

Grief may have you staying up too late or struggling to fall asleep. Make sure your room is set up for a restful night of sleep and avoid too much caffeine and screen time at night so you can wind down.

Change Your Career Path

Life is short, so make everything count, including your job. If you want a more fulfilling career, consider making a change. Revise your resume with a free online resume builder. Make your resume more professional and eye-catching with a library of professional designs you can use. Add colors, images and photos to help stand out.

Spend Time With Loved Ones

During your time of grief, help yourself heal by spending more time with loved ones. Take time to remember the person who passed by sharing memories, photos and stories. Celebrate their birthday and important anniversaries with your support system.

Get a New Pet

Another way to help cope with loss is to adopt a new pet. For people who have lost a spouse, this may help fill the loneliness void that comes with that loss. Research the type of pet, breed and care requirements before adopting. Consider rescuing a shelter dog or cat in your community.

Go Back to School

This may also be a good time to invest in your education and take classes. During the healing process, consider signing up for enrichment or academic classes to further your career. It may help occupy your mind and process your grief.

Practice More Spirituality

Religious practices may also help you deal with your grief during a loss. Consider meeting up with your rabbi or another spiritual advisor to get counseling or advice about your feelings. Learn more about the customs for death for a new outlook.

Start Journaling

Finally, journaling can also be a beneficial activity for your healing journey. Writing about your feelings may help you process them more effectively.

Losing someone special can trigger a powerful grief response. If you are struggling with healing after the death of a family member or friend, live a healthy lifestyle and try these healing strategies to maintain your physical and emotional well-being.

Star of David Memorial Chapels provides dignified and compassionate funeral services. Call 631-454-9600 to learn more.

How to Write an Obituary

How to Write an Obituary

How to Write an Obituary

An obituary is a way to share the news of a loved one’s death, to honor their life, and share their story with others. However, when you lose a loved one, and choose to write an obituary, it can be challenging to know what to say or how to memorialize them. Here are some tips on how to write an obituary.

1. Start with the basic information.

Include the full name, date, and place of birth, and date and place of death. List those who the decedent is survived by.

2. Briefly describe the person’s life.

Include education, work history, military service, and notable accomplishments or awards.

3. Share some personal details.

What was this person like? What were their hobbies and interests? What did they love most in life?

4. Invite family members to share their memories.

Include a quote or two from those who knew the person best.

5. End with a final thought or tribute.

This is your chance to say goodbye and express how much this person meant to you and others.

Writing an obituary can be a difficult but healing task. By honoring your loved one’s life, you can start the process of mourning and begin to heal your grief.

Our funeral directors at Star of David Memorial Chapels on Long Island, New York, are here to assist with all aspects of making funeral arrangements. Please get in touch with us at 631-454-9600.